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The general idea for this work was to invest a huge, giant effort to make something barely noticeable, tiny, and irrelevant. I got this idea while looking at the mountains with some very small snow remains during the early summer. Those snow remains are like white dots, shapes in the pastoral green landscapes, often very small, just a few pixels in the large image, digitally speaking. I wanted to do something with this 'white', to move it, to change it, to erase it, anything, so when I look at the mountain again from far away - I could see the difference, even if the change is microscopic. To make some micro change in the large landscape view/image, one would have to climb on the mountain, reach the snow and to manipulate with it in a way that it can be visible from the valley, or any spot far enough to see the whole mountain.
So I did it. For two summers I was searching the right situation in nature. When I found it finally, I performed a huge action. I climbed the mountain. Then, when I reached the snow, I realized that snow remains looking like very small white shapes from the valley - are huge up there.
One man with two hands can hardly do something with it and make it visible from a distant valley. But I managed to move enough snow with one bag and small hand tool from point A to point B, creating a new white shape, which was visible from the spot where you see the mountain as a landscape scene.

 

 

The landscape scene, which now had a new detail, a new tiny white shape. I made a change, a micro one, but a change.
Naturally, I made a video document of the whole action. But when I tried to make a work out of it - I didn't like the thing. Everything seems to be stupid. Well, the idea was stupid in the first place - to suffer so much to produce so little, almost nothing. Why I spent two summers trying to make it, what was it at the end - a land art, site specific, intervention, landscape painting or painting of a lanscape? It had something from each of these things, but it wasn't any of it. What was it all about?
This last question occures often in my mind faced with contemporary art. So I came to final idea to write a play for two imaginary persons who are observing the video material recorded on the mountain, and having a dialogue trying to understand what is going on in this work.
At the end, I realized that video material is too documentary for my taste and that is better to present only a still image of a mountain, while the play is running only as sound around the image.

Vladimir Nikolic

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